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Decoding a Decade - How media reflected and influenced cultural values during the 1960s

Page history last edited by PBworks 12 years, 11 months ago
Decoding a Decade
 
How Media Reflected and Influenced Cultural Values During the 1960s
 
Final Project by: Brianna and Sara
 
Enduring Understandings-
After this unit students will understand that:
  • Media reflects and simultaneously influences cultural values.
  • Examining the impetus and legacy of social and political movements of the past impacts our view of contemporary society. 
 
 
Objectives-
In this unit students will
  • Sequence significant events in the 1960s.
  • Analyze a variety of nonfiction materials selected from journals, essays, speeches, biographies and autobiographies (MN Language Arts Standard I.C.4)
  • Evaluate influential media from the 1960s. 
  • Synthesize a collection that represents some of the cultural values of the 1960’s.  
 
 
 
 
Lesson 1 - Media Reflects Cultural Values
 
Introduction: 
After modeling this for the students, they will examine present day examples of media (TV, magazine, internet, film, music, etc.) in groups of 3 and explain how they feel the media reflects our cultural values. (example: Bright Eyes - "When the President Talks to God")  Groups will be asked to share their findings.
 
Teacher will then give a brief introduction the 1960’s and the final project that the students will be working towards.  The previous exercise will be used as the point of reference. 
 
 

 

Lesson 2 - Civil Rights Movement
 
Concepts:
Civil Disobedience
Black Power
 
Outcomes:
1.Students will be able to compare and contrast the methods of civil rights leaders Dr. King and Malcolm X
2.Students will be able to analyze two speeches, one from each leader
3.Students will be able to evaluate how each speech reflected/influenced cultural values of the time.
Anticipatory Set:
Play either video or audio clip of each speech. Have students discuss with a partner whether they thought the speeches were similar or different. (10 min)
(I Have a Dream video)
(Ballot or Bullet speech-similar themes but not same as text below)

 

Body of Lesson:

Students will receive an excerpt from a MLK speech and an excerpt from a Malcolm X speech. They will have class time to read each and respond to the accompanying questions. Students will finish their work at home and come prepared to discuss findings the next class period.

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.
“I Have a Dream”
The March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom
August 28th, 1963
 
 
Directions: Read the following passage and answer the questions that follow. Some questions may have multiple correct answers.
 
 
“It would be a fatal flaw for the nation to overlook the urgency of the moment. This sweltering summer of the Negro’s legitimate discontent will not pass until there is an invigoration autumn of freedom and equality. Nineteen sixty-three is not an end but a beginning. Those who hoped that the Negro needed to blow off some steam and will now be content will have a rude awaking if the nation returns to business as usual. There will be neither rest nor tranquility in America until the Negro is granted his citizenship rights. The whirlwinds of revolt will continue to shake the foundations of our nations until the bright day of justice emerges. But there is something that I must say to my people who stand on the warm threshold which leads into the palace of justice. In the process of gaining our rightful place we must not be guilty of wrongful deeds. Let us not seek to satisfy our thirst for freedom by drinking from the cup of bitterness and hatred. We must forever conduct our struggle on the high plane of dignity and discipline. We must not allow our creative protest to degenerate into physical violence. Again and again we must rise to the majestic heights of meeting physical force with soul force.”
 
  • When and where was this speech presented? Who was the audience?
  • What is King referring to when he says, “Those who hoped that the Negro needed to blow off steam….”
  • How does King suggest African-Americans can work towards equal rights?
  • Overall, what is the tone of this speech? Please provide examples from the speech.
  • What values are reflected in this speech?
     
     
 
 
Malcolm X
“It shall be the Ballot or the Bullet”
Washington Heights, NY
March 29th, 1964
 
 
Directions: Read the following passage and answer the questions that follow. Some questions may have multiple correct answers.
 
“If you’re interested in freedom, you need some judo, you need some karate-you need all the things that will help you fight for freedom. If we don’t resort to the bullet, then immediately we have to take steps to use the ballot. Equality of opportunity, if the constitution at the present time [doesn’t offer it], then change it. Either it offers it, or it doesn’t offer it. If it offers it-good, then give it to us-if it doesn’t offer it, than change it. You don’t need a debate. You don’t need a filibuster. You need some action! So what you and I have to do is get involved. You and I have to be right there breathing down their throats. Every time they look over their shoulders, we want them to see us. We want to make them-we want to make them-pass the strongest civil rights bill they ever passed, because we know that even after they pass it, they can’t enforce it.”
 
  • When and where was this speech presented? Who was the audience?
  • What is King referring to when he says, “If you’re interested in freedom, you need judo, you need some karate….”
  • How does King suggest African-Americans can work towards equal rights?
  • Overall, what is the tone of this speech? Please provide examples from the speech.
  • What values are reflected in this speech?

 

 

 
Lesson 3 - Johnson’s War on Poverty
 
Concepts:
Great Society
Medicare/Medicaid
Food Stamps
Head Start
 
Objectives:
1.       Students will understand and be able to describe the Johnson administration’s Great Society policy
2.       Students will interpret symbols and explain the message of several editorial cartoons
3.       Students will describe how political cartoons in general reflect/influence the cultural values of a certain time period.
 
Body of the Lesson:
Students will receive lecture and additional reading to inform them on the Johnson administration’s “Great Society”. 
 
Have students respond to the following quote:
“Cartooning is an irreverent form of expression, and one particularly suited to scoffing at the high and the mighty. If the prime role of a free press is to serve as critic of government, cartooning is often the cutting edge of that criticism.”
“The Cartoon by Herb Block”
Ask students how examining political cartoons can teach about what is going on in the world, how it is being perceived by the public and what values are important at that time. After a brief class discussion, pairs of students will interpret 2 political cartoons and answer the following questions.
 
Closure:
As a formative assessment, students will be asked to complete a 3-2-1 and turn in at the end of the hour. 
List: 3 programs from the Great Society and what they did
       2 civil rights leaders and their approaches to activism
       1 one example describing how media has reflected/ influenced the cultural values of the 60’s

 

 

Interpreting Political Cartoons
Johnson’s Great Society
 
Directions: For each cartoon answer the questions below on the back of this handout.

 

 

            
 
 
Lesson 4 - Vietnam War, Hawks vs. Doves
 
Jigsaw I - 
The Political Speech
For homework, students will have read one of the speeches below.
 
Richard Nixon “Address to the Nation on the War in Vietnam”
or
John Kerry “Vietnam Veterans Against the War”
 
 
In class, students will be placed in groups of 4 by the article they read. Students will discuss:
  • What is the point of view or attitude of the speaker toward the Vietnam War?
  • How would you describe the tone of the speaker? Does it strengthen or weaken the arguments made by the speaker?
  • What is the significance of this address?
  • What values are reflected in this speech?
 
Students will then be grouped into new foursomes – 2 Nixon, 2 Kerry and teach each other about what they read.
 
Popular music
Students will remain in their groups and examine how similar sentiments are presented in popular music.
 
 “War” by Edwinn Starr (1970)
“Ballad of the Green Beret” (1965) by Sgt. Barry Saddler and Robin Moore
 
  1. After listening to both songs, students compare and contrast the mood of the song “War" with “TheBallad of the Green Beret.” What three adjectives could be used to describe the mood and tone of “War?”
  2. In both songs, women play a secondary role.  Contrast the role of the young wife in “Ballad of the Green Beret” with the mother in “War”.
  3. How are the soldiers in both songs portrayed differently?  Use specific lyric references to explain your answer.
  4. Select two lyrics from Starr’s song that demonstrate his most effective arguments against armed conflicts.
  5. How would a Green Beret respond to the lyric “Life is too short and precious to spend fighting wars these days?”
  6. What lyrics does Starr use to describe the result of the Vietnam War experience for young men?
  7. How do the words “Good God Y’all” and Good God Now” enhance the message of the song?
 
 
 
Mementos from The Wall
To see how the war affected those who fought and those who were left behind, studets will read excerpts from Letters on the Wall: Offerings and Remembrances from the Vietnam Veterans Memorial.
 
 Students could also view clips from films such as Unknown Soldier  by John Hulme 
 
 
 
 
Lesson 5 - Music of the 60s: What is the music saying?
 
Potential songs:
“Volunteers” Jefferson Airplane
“Turn, Turn, Turn” The Byrds
“Blowin’ in the Wind” Bob Dylan
“We Shall Overcome” Joan Baez
“Say It Loud (I’m Black and I’m Proud)" James Brown
“Think” Aretha Franklin
“Abraham, Martin and John” Dion
“Keep Your Eyes on the Prize” Alice Wine
 
Divide class into small groups of 3 to 5 students. Assign one song to each group and distribute the lyrics. Instruct each group to listen carefully to the song and relate it to material covered in class, keeping in mind the following questions:
  • What emotions are expressed by the song (lyrics and/or music)?
  • To whom is the song addressed?
  • What issues, problems, or events are presented in the song? Does the song seem to be written in response to a specific event?
  • What points of view or attitudes are revealed?  What cultural values are reflected?
  • What were the circumstances at the time the song was released?
  • Does this song suggest any solutions to the issues/problems addressed?
  • How effective is this song as a social protest?
  • What, if any, relevance does this song have to American society today
  • Have groups report back to class on answers to these questions. Have class compare and contrast the multiple points of view found in the songs.
     
     
     
    Lesson 6 - The Drug Culture  
     

     
    Concepts:
    “dropping-out”
    Commune
    LSD
     
    Objectives:
    1.Students will analyze video that depicts the drug culture during the 60’s
    2.Students will compare and contrast the video depictions with the written text from Go Ask Alice
    3.Students will describe the reflected values of the time as portrayed in the clips and reading
     
     
     
    Body of Lesson:
    Students will watch 3 video clips that portray the drug culture that existed during the 60’s. They will answer several questions and discuss them with a partner. Next they will read several excerpts from the novel Go Ask Alice (have students pick 2-3 diary entries to read, one earlier in the book, one midway through and one closer to the end). Individually, students will compare the video depictions with the written one and write one to two paragraphs as a homework assignment describing the tone and message in each of the examples example. 
     
     
    CLIPS:
     
     
     
    Drug Culture in the 60’s - Video Clip Comparison
     
    Clip #1:
    1.       Describe the setting, the characters, the costumes. What are some film techniques used?
    2.        What are the characters doing? What is their attitude towards their own behavior? What is their attitude towards other’s behavior?
    3.        What is the overall tone and message portrayed in the clip?
     
    Clip #2:
    1.       Describe the setting, the characters, the costumes. What are some film techniques used?
    2.        What are the characters doing? What is their attitude towards their own behavior? What is their attitude towards other’s behavior?
    3.        What is the overall tone and message portrayed in the clip?
     
    Clip #3:
    1.       Describe the setting, the characters, the costumes. What are some film techniques used?
    2.        What are the characters doing? What is their attitude towards their own behavior? What is their attitude towards other’s behavior?
    3.        What is the overall tone and message portrayed in the clip?
     
     
     
    Lesson 7 - A Picture is Worth A Thousand Words
     
    Students will begin to collect images for their final projects by spending time searching the Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Online Catalogue.
     
    1.  Search Vietnam War Protest and save 2 images to your folder.  Be sure copy and save source information. 
    2.  Search Bob Dylan and save 2 images to your folder. Be sure copy and save source information. 
    3.  Search Martin Luther King, Jr. and save 2 images to your folder. Be sure copy and save source information. 
    4.  Continue to search terms of your choosing and save images for your final project. Be sure copy and save source information for all images.
     
    To help students organize their thoughts and keep track of their media samples, they may use the attached document. 
     
     
     
     
     
    Final Project - 1960s Collection
     
    Students will create a collection in the form of a website or iMovie that displays their understanding of how media reflected/influenced the cultural values of the 1960s. 
     
    Website/iMovie will include:
     
    1. 2 songs of the 1960’s*
    2. 2 movies (clips or poster) from the 1960s
    3. 2 pieces of written text from the 1960’s
    4. Images taken/created during the 1960s (minimum 15)
    5. Defense of choices (see below)
     
     
    Students should select media samples that they believe reflects/influences the cultural values of the 1960’s. Students will defend their choices either in a paper (iMovie) or on the website, 1 detailed paragraph per media type.  Students will present their final project to the class in a short oral presentation.    
     
    *To ensure access, teacher may want to provide a CD anthology of 60s music for students to choose their songs from. 
     

    Rubric for 60s Collection  Website/iMovie

     

     

    Novice

    1 pt

    Intermediate

    3 pts

    Expert

    5 pts

    Points Awarded

    Subject Knowledge

     

    (Show what you know about the 60’s)

    Some subject knowledge is evident. Some information is confusing, incorrect, or flawed.

    Subject knowledge is evident in much of the project. Most information is clear, appropriate, and correct.

    Subject knowledge is evident throughout the project. All information is clear, appropriate, and correct.

     

    Technical Requirements

     

    Includes less than 2 songs, 2 movie clips, 2 texts and 15 images

    Includes 2 songs, 2 movie clips, 2 texts and 15 images

    Includes more than 2 songs, 2 movie clips, 2 texts and 15 images

     

    Organization

     

    (Does the project flow?)

    The sequence of information is somewhat logical. Menus, paths and/or transitions are confusing and flawed.

    The sequence of information is logical. Menus, paths and/or transitions to most information are clear and direct.

    The sequence of information is logical and intuitive. Menus, paths and/or transitions to all information are clear and direct.

     

    Creativity/

    Design

     

    (Have you thought about the way it looks to a viewer?)

     

    (Is it easy to follow your train of thought?)

    Multimedia elements accompany content but there is little sign of mutual reinforcement. There is no attention to visual design criteria such as balance, proportion, harmony and restraint. There is some tendency toward random use of graphical elements that do not reinforce message.

     

    Multimedia elements and content combine to adequately deliver a high impact message with the elements and words reinforcing each other. 

     

    The combination of multimedia elements and content takes communication to a superior level. There is clear attention given to balance, proportion, harmony, and restraint. The synergy reaches the intended audience with style and pizzazz.

     

     

    Depth & Breadth of Project Content

     

    (Show that you learned the enduring understandings of the unit)

    Little evidence that higher level thinking skills were used in the creation of this project.  Project objectives are not clearly articulated and explanation of main concepts seem confused or missing

     

    Some evidence that higher level thinking skills were used in the creation of this project. Project objectives articulated and main concepts

    understood

    Clear evidence that higher level thinking skills were used in the creation of this project.

    Project objectives clearly articulated and main concepts explained in detail

     

     

    Oral Presentation Skills

    Some difficulty communicating ideas, due to voice projection, lack of preparation, or incomplete work

    Communicates ideas with proper voice projection. Adequate preparation and delivery.

    Communicates ideas with enthusiasm, proper voice projection, appropriate language, and clear delivery.

     

                                                                                                                Total Points Awarded:       /30

     

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